Medium 30074
6.8
Very Good

Spider-Man: Homecoming was an interesting experience. The best way to describe it is that it's really two different films in one. It's one part comic book film and one part high school drama.

As a comic book film, I found the movie to be average at best. Honestly they didn't write a really good Spider-Man film and there are a number of reasons for that. The first thing you realize almost immediately is that this is not an origin story and yet it still plays like one. The movie takes place eight years after the events of Avengers and the film focuses heavily on the aftermath of the Battle for New York. This is the first big issue I had with this story. The plot centers on the idea that a construction crew, led by Michael Keaton, is made up of upstanding citizens who have a government (city) contract to help clean up the alien debris from the battle. The federal government swoops in early on and tells them that all cleanup will be handled by the Federal government. This is a problem for Michael Keaton because he invested everything into the venture and now he's left with nothing. Then suddenly the film jumps ahead eight years and now he's a weapons dealer selling super weapons made by combining alien tech with human ingenuity.

We are given no background or legitimate justification into how a group of construction workers are able to build such high level tech. Even more ridiculous is the fact that they appear to have only one engineer who for whatever reason wasn't using his expertise to get rich building weapons for the US government who we already know would gladly pay for something like that because of the events shown in Avengers. The other big issue is that the film ignores the fact that in the US when a government contract is absorbed by the government any good lawyer would have gotten the contract holder a fat payout. The entire film really didn't need to happen but maybe Michael Keaton just really liked the idea of being a criminal even though his motivation was to support his family as a legitimate business man literally minutes earlier in the film.

The other issue with the plot is that it takes place in Spider-Man's sophomore year of high school but after the events of Captain America 3: Civil War. At this point Peter is only 15 years old yet he's been a super hero for quite some time. The film goes through none of the classic origin story tropes like learning how to use his powers, making web fluid, or figuring out how to fight. It's just assumed that by age 15 he has a handle on everything. I didn't like this because the film clearly rides the coattails of the other five Spider-Man films, even though they are set in different universes. It assumes you are very familiar with the character and thus does nothing to justify his existence. Yet at the same time it plays like an origin story by focusing on Peter learning how to use his new suit he got from Tony Stark. As far as comic films go, there are some powerful moments and good visuals, but it's possibly the laziest MCU film to date as far as storytelling.

While I didn't really like it as a comic book film, Spider-Man: Homecoming was one of the best high school coming of age films I've seen in a long time. It was real. It was personal. They did such a great job of depicting what it's like to be in high school. I personally identified with the story of a nerd just trying to fit in, have fun, and get the girl because the performances were so authentic. It was like really watching high schoolers even though Tom Holland is 21 and the girl is 27 in real life. I especially appreciated the friendship between Peter and his best friend Ned. They were so real, down to the long secret handshakes and Death Star Lego set.

The film is fun to watch and has some great moments, but the comic book aspects of the plot, other than a few key moments, are pretty half baked and lack any real depth.

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Spider Man: Homecoming

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